New recipes

What's Inside McDonald's Beef and More News

What's Inside McDonald's Beef and More News


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

In today's Media Mix, road kill found in restaurant, plus White House healthy eating tips

Arthur Bovino

The Daily Meal brings you the biggest news from the food world.

McDonald's Spills Beef Patty Ingredients: Ever wonder what's really in your McDonald's beef? Well, according to the PR arm of McDonald's Canada, a mixture of lean beef and fattier beef, and no pink slime. [Gizmodo]

Road Kill Found in Restaurant: A Kentucky restaurant was closed down after customers complained that employees brought in a dead animal; turns out, the owner was going to cook a deer found on the side of the road for his family. [The Sacramento Bee]

White House Chef Tips: For people watching their weight, Sam Kass recommends making small changes like switching to low-fat milk, drinking water instead of juice, and choosing wheat bread. [Scranton Times Tribune]

Thomas Keller, Daniel Boulud Host Dinner: Last Saturday Thomas Keller, Daniel Boulud, and Jérome Bocuse cooked up a meal at $2,500 a plate for the World Master Chefs Dinner. [Culture Map]

Cooking For Celebs: A chef spills on what Orlando Bloom, Miranda Kerr, and Gwyneth Paltrow love to eat. Paltrow's favorite: "Asian wraps with rice paper, prawns, seeds, nuts, and herbs and an Asian dipping sauce with agave and tamari." Figures. [News.com.au]


What's in a Big Mac? Will YOU eat a McDonald's again after reading this?

Link copied

Everyone - even Kim Kardashian - loves a McDonald's burger

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they'll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

It all started last month when a pharmacist let us into the inside secret about what really happens to your body when you drink Coca-Cola (or so he believes).

Now, it's all about McDonalds - long hailed as the king of fast food.

The Fast Food Menu Price has produced an info graphic claiming to show McDonald's customers what they can expect after they chow down on one of the chain's most popular products: a Big Mac.

The double burger, triple bun and burger sauce combination has been a favourite for many thousands of Britons since it was first invented back in 1967.

Related articles

This infographic shows what the FFMP claim happens to your body when you eat a McDonald's

The Big Mac is a popular choice for consumers on the high street

The FFMP claim the first 10 minutes after consuming the burger, our body's blood sugar is raised - pretty standard stuff.

The Big Mac releases a certain set of 'feel good' chemicals which they compare to taking drugs like cocaine.

After 20 minutes, they claim your body is craving more and more of the fructose corn syrup found in the burger bun.

A casual 30 minutes after consuming the treat, they go onto claim 970 milligrams of sodium (salt) will dehydrate you. According to the FFMP this is easily mistaken for hunger, making customers think they want another burger.

McDonald s secret Big Mac sauce for sale

Wackiest deep-fried foods


McDonald's just pulled the plug on its biggest menu change in years

"Create Your Taste" allowed customers to build burgers from more than 30 premium ingredients, buns, and sauces, including bacon, caramelized grilled onions, chili lime tortilla strips, guacamole, and jalapenos.

Customers ordered the burgers from touch-screen kiosks inside McDonald's restaurants.

It was arguably the biggest menu change for McDonald's in more than 40 years, since the introduction of breakfast. Many franchisees invested roughly $125,000 per location to install the "Create Your Taste" kiosks in their restaurants.

But within the last month, it suddenly began disappearing from restaurant menus from San Francisco to New York, Business Insider learned based on information from more than half a dozen McDonald's locations across the US.

McDonald's spokeswoman Becca Hary confirmed the change.

" Create Your Taste was a test, which we used as the name for customizable burgers in select cities," Hary told Business Insider. "McDonald’s is now testing a customizable burger platform under the name 'Signature Crafted Recipes.'"

Customers liked ordering from kiosks and personalizing their food, according to McDonald's. And the burgers got largely positive feedback in online reviews.

In mid-2015, the company said it had plans to roll out "Create Your Taste" to 2,000 restaurants nationwide, or roughly one in seven of McDonald's more than 14,000 restaurants in the US. At the time, it was available in seven states.

But there were a few problems with "Create Your Taste." Some customers complained that the burgers were too expensive and took too long to cook.

Business Insider’s Hollis Johnson tested the program at a New York City McDonald’s and paid $10 for a burger with bacon, tomato, onions, cheddar cheese, guacamole, and two sauces, along with sides of fries and a drink. That’s about twice the cost of a Big Mac meal. His meal took eight minutes to prepare.

Some franchisees also complained about the cost of the program, and said it slowed down kitchen operations and targeted an upscale customer that McDonald's shouldn't be going after.

McDonald's decision to get rid of the full "Create Your Taste" menu and replace it with "Signature Crafted Recipes" should help solve some of these issues.

"Signature Crafted Recipes" has fewer options for customization than "Create Your Taste" with bundled toppings that should make it easier for kitchens to handle. The company started testing it earlier this year.

"Our customers appreciate the additional choices and the control of being able to order from kiosks," Hary said. "We’re always testing and looking at new ideas and concepts to provide our customers with a great restaurant experience. "

The Signature Crafted menu allows customers to choose from one of three proteins — beef, buttermilk crispy chicken, or grilled chicken — and one of four topping bundles: maple bacon Dijon, deluxe, buffalo bacon, and pico guacamole. A sriracha topping bundle is also available at some restaurants.

The menu is available to order from the touch-screen kiosks that were used for "Create Your Taste."


McDonald’s founder Ray Kroc would not have approved. In 1995, McDonald’s introduced a hot dog, called — you guessed it! — the McHotDog.

The hot dog was sold in the Midwest, and it is still available in some Japanese McDonald’s restaurants as well.

According to Mental Floss, Ray Kroc would have been upset, as he said he never wanted to serve the item at any of his restaurants, saying, “There’s no telling what’s inside a hot dog’s skin, and our standard of quality just wouldn’t permit that kind of item.”


Shocking Video Of YouTuber Eating 14-Month-Old McDonald's Burger Goes Viral

Highlights

There are many people who are obsessed with food. But being obsessed with decayed and rotting food is truly unheard of. YouTuber Matt Davin, who hails from South Yorkshire, United Kingdom, took it upon himself to take up what he called the 'McDonald's 365 Challenge' for his 40th birthday. He took an extreme step by buying a meal from McDonald's on his 39th birthday in November 2018 and then burying it in his friend's garden, to be retrieved a year later on his 40th birthday.

Matt Davin, however, got delayed by two months and only recovered the burger in February 2020. He then took out the burger from his friend's garden and dusted it off. The 14-month-old burger was then eaten by the YouTuber in a step-by-step video documenting the entire eating process in a video on his YouTube channel by the name 'Beeper Beef'. Take a look:

Did he or did not manage to consume the entire burger? The shocking video shows him actually finishing the mouldy burger, as well as the fries and shake that were buried with it. He gagged a few times in the middle of when he was eating the burger, but he managed to finish it off. He told the camera in the YouTube video that he had taken up a few weird food challenges since college, which was where he thought it all started. "I remember seeing something where someone had preserved a McDonald's meal for years so I decided to take it a step further and eat it," said Davin in the video.

As for reactions to the video, several YouTube users poured in their responses to the video. A user said, "News flash, New Mac' corona virus found in England," while another encapsulated popular opinion and said, "If you don't get food poisoning it will be a miracle." But surprisingly, Matt Davin commented that he was absolutely fine after eating the meal and had no side-effects.

Would you try to make such a food record? Tell us in the comments below!

About Aditi Ahuja Aditi loves talking to and meeting like-minded foodies (especially the kind who like veg momos). Plus points if you get her bad jokes and sitcom references, or if you recommend a new place to eat at.


McDonald's just pulled the plug on 'Create Your Taste' in the US

McDonald’s has ended its custom-burger menu test called “Create Your Taste” in the US and replaced it with a new version called “Signature Crafted Recipes,” the company confirmed to Business Insider.

“Create Your Taste” allowed customers to build burgers from more than 30 premium ingredients, buns, and sauces, including bacon, caramelised grilled onions, chilli lime tortilla strips, guacamole, and jalapenos.

Customers ordered the burgers from touch-screen kiosks inside McDonald’s restaurants.

It was arguably the biggest menu change for McDonald’s in more than 40 years, since the introduction of breakfast. Many franchisees invested roughly $125,000 per location to install the “Create Your Taste” kiosks in their restaurants.

But within the last month, it suddenly began disappearing from restaurant menus from San Francisco to New York, Business Insider learned based on information from more than half a dozen McDonald’s locations across the US.

McDonald’s spokeswoman Becca Hary confirmed the change.

“Create Your Taste was a test, which we used as the name for customisable burgers in select cities,” Hary told Business Insider. “McDonald’s is now testing a customisable burger platform under the name ‘Signature Crafted Recipes.'”

“Create Your Taste” began rolling out in select states in late 2014 and started expanding nationally the following year.
Customers liked ordering from kiosks and personalizing their food, according to McDonald’s. And the burgers got largely positive feedback in online reviews.

In mid-2015, the company said it had plans to roll out “Create Your Taste” to 2,000 restaurants nationwide, or roughly one in seven of McDonald’s more than 14,000 restaurants in the US. At the time, it was available in seven states.

But there were a few problems with “Create Your Taste.” Some customers complained that the burgers were too expensive and took too long to cook.

Business Insider’s Hollis Johnson tested the program at a New York City McDonald’s and paid $10 for a burger with bacon, tomato, onions, cheddar cheese, guacamole, and two sauces, along with sides of fries and a drink. That’s about twice the cost of a Big Mac meal. His meal took eight minutes to prepare.

Some franchisees also complained about the cost of the program, and said it slowed down kitchen operations and targeted an upscale customer that McDonald’s shouldn’t be going after.

McDonald’s decision to get rid of the full “Create Your Taste” menu and replace it with “Signature Crafted Recipes” should help solve some of these issues.

“Signature Crafted Recipes” has fewer options for customisation than “Create Your Taste” with bundled toppings that should make it easier for kitchens to handle. The company started testing it earlier this year.

“Our customers appreciate the additional choices and the control of being able to order from kiosks,” Hary said. “We’re always testing and looking at new ideas and concepts to provide our customers with a great restaurant experience.”

The Signature Crafted menu allows customers to choose from one of three proteins — beef, buttermilk crispy chicken, or grilled chicken — and one of four topping bundles: maple bacon Dijon, deluxe, buffalo bacon, and pico guacamole. A sriracha topping bundle is also available at some restaurants.

The menu is available to order from the touch-screen kiosks that were used for “Create Your Taste.”


Inside McDonald’s ‘Fresh’ Evolution: From Burgers And Fries To Cuties, Smoothies And Salads

I remember a baby blue Volkswagen Beetle, my mother’s car when I was 2 or 3. Society was not as smart as we are today, so I was napping in the luggage compartment in the back seat (and that was not illegal). I distinctly remember waking up, informing mom that “I smell my hamburgers!” then raising my head to peek over the seat and indeed seeing the iconic Golden Arches looming overhead like the gateway to Valhalla.

Classic: Double cheeseburger and the world’s best fries that’s the kind of fare you would expect at America’s oldest operating McDonald’s (above photo) built in 1953 in Downey, CA, the third in an eventual chain of thousands.

A minister’s son, I spent my childhood in a series of small Southern towns – we always judged whether the burg we were living in at any particular time was big-time or country bohunk by the presence of a McDonald’s. As a teenager with a fresh driver’s license, my Friday nights were spent circling through the parking lot of the Conyers, GA McDonald’s, along with every other kid in town in a parade that only ended periodically to go in and grab another burger or shake.

Flash forward a few years it’s the 1990s and I’m a parent myself. My 3-year-old is a Happy Meal fanatic, obsessively collecting every toy in every series that came along. As he got older, the annual McDonald’s Monopoly game meant we’d be dining there at least twice a week to get more game pieces.

It’s a different world now…

One-in-eight of us has worked for McDonald’s at some point. The company is the world’s second-largest employer after Wal-Mart. It is the single largest purchaser of beef, pork, potatoes and apples in the United States.

That’s the McDonald’s I grew up with. If you have grown children, your experience is likely not dissimilar. McDonald’s was a destination. McDonald’s was an institution. McDonald’s was America.

Then something happened. Science showed first that the beef tallow Mickey D’s fried those unquestioned world’s-best French fried potatoes in was sketchy. More science explained how horrible for us certain kinds of fats were. As evidence mounted, nutrition began to matter as much as flavor for the first time in American history.

Suddenly, McDonald’s had a black eye. Or two. And while the company never once held a gun to anyone’s head and forced them to order a super-sized combo, society had painted a bullseye that directly overlapped those famed arches.

Did McDonald’s Invent The Clementine?

None of that happened in a vacuum. McDonald’s was paying attention. Starting almost 20 years ago the company began making menu tweaks that created a more food-forward, wholesome balance. It’s a process that has continued unabated for two decades. Fresh produce elbowed its way onto the menu alongside those famous burgers and fries.

More than just a Cutie…

McDonald’s almost singlehandedly created the market for clementines, which have in turn first dominated then cannibalized the rest of the citrus category, when it introduced the seedless easy peelers to its kid-friendly Happy Meals in 2012. A new line of salads rolled out in June 2016 ditches the iceberg lettuce of old for a mix of ingredients any salad aficionado or produce manager would approve of. Smoothies and parfaits are made with U.S.-sourced and -grown fruit picked by hand six days a week. Even the classic fried apple pie has evolved into a baked item made with six kinds of American apples.

But people still carry a perception that nothing good with food happens beneath the Golden Arches, that Ronald McDonald is a scheming corporate robber baron secretly in partnership with the Hamburglar to destroy us all.

A Lot of McNuggets: $25 Billion In Annual Sales

That doesn’t mean we’re not eating there. McDonald’s sales peaked at an all-time high of $28.1 billion in 2013 last year’s total was $24.6 billion (part of that revenue drop is due to the refranchising or sale of some corporate locations – regardless, that’s still a lot of McNuggets).

McCafe smoothies are made with fresh fruit picked six days a week

McDonald’s is trying very hard to get your attention and correct some misperceptions. They’re listening to customers and society at large. Since Steve Easterbrook became CEO in January 2015, McDonald’s has continued to slim down, literally and figuratively. A menu that had ballooned to almost 200 items was trimmed to more manageable levels. Breakfast became an all-day choice. High-fructose corn syrup was removed from sandwich buns. Chicken McNuggets are now made with no artificial preservatives.

Dr. Cindy Goody, PhD, MBA, RD, LDN, might sound like a perfectly named McDonaldland character. But she is the very real Senior Director of Menu Innovation – Ingredients & Nutrition for McDonald’s USA. She arrived after several years as a retail and clinical dietitian for HY-VEE Food Stores, Inc. in Iowa City, IA. She is a scholarly author and has also served as a faculty member for the Culinary Institute of America and Harvard School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education.

When McDonald’s is reviewing menu items or research, Dr. Goody is at the table. She develops plans that align McDonald’s U.S. food and nutrition strategies provides food and ingredient and nutritional science expertise and oversees nutritional information development and communication processes. .

She’s no Mayor McCheese, but “as a member of the Menu Innovation Team — think R&D — I have the opportunity to inform what’s goes into our food and beverage creations and how they’re prepared,” Goody says.

Fresh Evolution Started With Apple Slices In 2000

Goody traces McDonald’s ‘fresh’ evolution of the past two decades back to the addition of apple slices to the menu in 2000 as a Happy Meal option (they became an automatic part of the meal in 2011). She’s quick to point out that the company dished up more than 2 billion servings of fruit and low-fat dairy products in kids meals between 2012-2016.

McDonald’s salads: Colorful and nutritious

“It’s our customers who inform the direction we take,” Goody says. “In 2012, customers kept telling us, ’We want something more…I want a piece of fresh fruit that’s obviously portable, affordable, accessible and that my child can easily peel.’ Voila: the Cuties clementine. Think about that journey, the amount of fruit we’ve been able to introduce into the American diet — 78 million Cuties have been served since they launched in 2012.

“In the U.S. we offer a side salad in lieu of fries as part of an extra value meal. In 2013 we offered blueberries for a limited time only in a yogurt parfait. We want to be mindful about what’s available to us in the United States. We’ll bring menu items on and off as it makes sense over the year. We’ve introduced different types of produce — last year at this time we updated our salad blend to include a variety of lettuces and baby spinach and kale and that all comes from our customers’ evolving palates. Put simply, we’re on a journey to be better and we have made a number of changes that our customers can feel good about because we understand now more than ever that people care about their food – where it comes from, what goes into it, and how it is prepared.”

Feeding The U.S. Population Every 11 Days

McDonald’s serves 27 million people in the U.S. daily — the equivalent of feeding the entire population every 11 days. That being the case, Goody and her colleagues realize they actually have the opportunity to flip the script, to change the perception of McDonald’s as the ultimate in junkfood to a force for better food around the world.

“It’s really about using our scale for good – put a different way, it’s like what the famous management guru Peter Drucker said about doing things right and doing the right thing,” Goody says.

Drucker said, “Management is doing things right leadership is doing the right things.”

A modern McDonald’s

“When we hear from our customers, we’re already starting to have those conversations [internally] about where customers are going to achieve a critical mass,” Goody says. There is “a very fine balance between what our customers want and need. When we announced we would go to cage-free eggs by 2025 and 100 companies followed our announcement, that’s a fine example of using that power for good. McDonald’s has such a big impact in the industry.”

Produce will continue to make its way onto the McDonald’s menu – a partnership with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation constantly looks for more and better ways to deliver fruit, vegetables and low-fat dairy to McDonald’s diners.

“We’re becoming more of a visual society. Think about the orange of a Cutie or Tuscan lettuce or a beautiful red grape tomato, carrots in salads — customers are telling us they want more color,” Goody said. “We continue our beloved fruit and yogurt parfait made with lowfat vanilla yogurt and berries, a third of a cup of fruit total. The apple pies, they’re hard to beat. The seasonal pies, again real fruit.”

The McRib: Hate to love it or love to hate it?

Nobody’s making the argument that McDonald’s will become a health food restaurant any time soon. But they do want to make sure you know you have options, whether that’s an entrée salad and a side smoothie or a Big Mac and an order of fries.

“We have a variety of menu choices and a variety of portion sizes for most all appetites – flavor is very important to the customer and we’ll continue to lead with a variety of flavors,” Goody says.

Including the McRib, the sandwich that comes and goes and sets off waves of nostalgia and hype whenever it reappears?

“The McRib is legendary, just like the Shamrock Shake, from the ‘70s and ‘80s – I’ll raise my Shamrock Shake to you,” Goody joshes. “But really all food fits in the context of the diet, it’s about really enjoying the foods you eat and being mindful of portion size. We are a team of chefs, scientists, supply chain experts, marketers and restaurant operations professionals who are focused on menu development, delivery and more all while delivering on our brand purpose of making delicious, feel-good moments easy for everyone.”


Beef Tallow French Fries

Adapted From “McMenu: Do-It-Yourself McDonald’s Restaurant Recipes”

Yields two medium-sized orders of fries.

2 large russet potatoes
¼ cup white sugar
2 tablespoons white corn syrup (Karo)
1𔃀 cups hot water
6 cups Crisco shortening
¼ cup beef tallow
Salt to taste

1. Peel the potatoes and cut them into shoestrings. They should be about ¼ inch x ¼ inch in thickness and about 4 inches to 6 inches long.

2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar, corn syrup, and hot water. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Place the potatoes into the bowl of the sugar-water and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

3. While they’re soaking, pack the shortening into a deep-fryer. If you don’t have a deep-fryer, any sauce pot or dutch oven will suffice as long as you have an appropriate thermometer. Heat on the highest setting until the shortening has liquefied and reads between 375° and 400° F.

4. Drain the potatoes then dump them into the fryer (be careful, it will be ferocious). Nudge them around to make sure they don’t stick to one another. After 1 to 1 ½ minutes, transfer the potatoes to a paper towel–lined plate. Let them cool 8 to 10 minutes in the refrigerator.

5. While they’re cooling, add the beef tallow to the hot shortening and bring temperature back to between 375° and 400° F.

6. Add the potatoes and deep-fry again for 5 to 7 minutes or until golden brown. Again, nudge lightly to keep them from becoming one mega-fry. Remove and place them in a large bowl, sprinkling generously with salt and tossing to mix the salt evenly. Serve hot and enjoy.

The buttery, crunchy, golden-brown results. Luke Fater for Gastro Obscura

Done properly, the McMenu PDF will leave you with a pile of commercial-ready, golden-brown, pre-Sokolofian shoestrings. As for taste, it became clear on my first bite why it took $15 million to put them out of production. Where modern fries are bland and leave my mouth with the aforementioned uneasy beaniness, the McMenu PDF fries pack a serious punch that left my palate screaming for more. A subtle, beefy umami saddled neatly next to the underlying sweetness from brining. The crisp, browned edges provided an audible crunch. The insides retained a sweet, buttery texture. My only complaint was that I had to stop eating and photograph them. They are hands-down the best fast-food fries I’ve ever eaten.

As for authenticity, I personally wasn’t alive to try McDonald’s original french fries before 1990, so cannot attest to the veracity of the McMenu fries’ flavor—but Chandler was, and does. “As soon as I tried a few of them, I was back in my mom’s Volvo 240 station wagon [in 1988], waiting for my sister to get distracted enough so I could steal her McNuggets.”

Without a blessing from the Golden Arches themselves, I’ll never know if I’ve uncovered the true original recipe, and after speaking to Okura, I realize “true” here may be a moving target. As McDonald’s expanded, he says, corporate would have necessarily adapted the fry-making process to meet the scale of supply. Of course, there is a chance that the McMenu PDF recipe was at one point the true recipe. But as for when, that secret lies with Ray Kroc.

* Correction: This story originally stated that American soldiers ushered a love of french fries into the American culinary consciousness after World War II. It was World War I.

Gastro Obscura covers the world’s most wondrous food and drink.
Sign up for our email, delivered twice a week.


Arch Deluxe

@AnthonyKincart/Twitter

There was nothing wrong with the actual Arch Deluxe burger that McDonald's debuted in 1996. It had bacon, lettuce, tomato, cheese, onions, ketchup, and a secret sauce.

The problem was the advertising, which McDonald's famously spent over $200 million on. The company marketed the Arch Deluxe as a sandwich for only adults, calling it "the burger with the grown-up taste." The company even launched a commercial featuring two young rappers saying "yuck" when they saw the Arch Deluxe. Wrong move, Mickey D's!

The Arch Deluxe didn't find its fans and was yanked from McDonald's menu in 2000 (though it made a brief return in 2018). But at least it brought us this commercial featuring a young Jessica Biel.

RELATED: The easy way to make healthier comfort foods.


18. McDonald's acquired tech startups to help speed up drive-thrus.

McDonald&aposs acquired two tech startups — Apprente and Dynamic Yield — with the intention, in part, of fixing its drive-thru business. It also invested millions of dollars in upgrading drive-thrus to speed up wait times, the company announced in September.

Easterbrook said McDonald&aposs drive-thru times dropped by 20 seconds over the most recent quarter in a call with investors in October.



Comments:

  1. Lindberg

    Sorry, I can't help you. I think you will find the right solution.



Write a message