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Morel and Spring Vegetable Hash

Morel and Spring Vegetable Hash


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Arrange a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a medium bowl, toss the potatoes with the oil, rosemary, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Transfer the potatoes to a large baking sheet and roast until crispy and fork-tender, about 30 minutes. Remove the potatoes from the oven and set aside.

Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Add the morels and boil for 10 seconds. (This cleans the morels and kills any worms or spores that might be in them.) Using a slotted spoon, transfer the morels to a cutting board. Pat the morels dry, halve them, and set aside.

In a 14-inch cast-iron skillet set over medium heat, melt the butter and cook until blond. Add the asparagus and spring onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions start to wilt and the asparagus gets a little color on it, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 1 minute. Add the morels, cover the skillet, and cook until the morels release their natural juices, about 1 minute.

Remove the lid from the skillet and add the potatoes, parsley, thyme, lemon zest, and lemon juice and stir to combine. Add the peas and spinach, stir to combine, and cook, stirring frequently, until the spinach wilts, about 2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Using a large serving spoon, divide the hash among 4 to 6 large bowls or plates. Now eat.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


5 Ways to Cook Morel Mushrooms (If You're Lucky Enough to Find Some)

&lsquoTis the season for one of the most treasured and tasty mushrooms on Earth. If you can spot and snag some, here are the best ways to cook morel mushrooms to put your harvest to delicious use.

The first bite I ever took of these unique mushrooms was in a risotto. A bed of lusciously creamy arborio rice came blanketed in saut local mushrooms, including the stand-out morels. Each bite was better than the last. From that moment on, I kept my eyes peeled for more morels, both on menus and in the wild. 

Luckily, I spotted them soon after in another dish. This time, the mushrooms topped ricotta-slathered toast, which came complete with nature’s best condiment: a runny egg yolk. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by a couple of creations that would have been delicious nonetheless, but what made the dishes truly memorable were the morels.

These mushrooms are particularly coveted because they are one of the few edible items we savor that aren’t farmed or raised they’re only grown and gathered in their native, wild habitat. Morels are fairly rare (hence the fierce competition come mushroom hunting season) and only pop up in specific weather conditions for just a couple months each spring. Their scarcity is a big reason morels sell for such top dollar (one pound can sell for anywhere between $20 and $100!).

Unlike some other varieties of mushrooms that can err on the slimy side in certain recipes, morels have a nutty, toasted flavor and meaty texture that stands up beautifully once cooked.

So how do you cook these treasures, if you’re lucky enough to find some? First (and very importantly), give 𠆎m a good clean, then consider one of these delicious methods for cooking morel mushrooms.


Watch the video: Wild Spring Delicacies- Ramps, Morels, Fiddleheads, Birch Sap (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Buach

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  2. Nealon

    Very helpful question



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