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Passover almond cake recipe

Passover almond cake recipe


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This Passover cake comes from the Alsace region of France. Just four ingredients! You'll want to bake this year-round.

8 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 7 eggs, separated
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 120ml vegetable oil
  • 300g finely ground almonds

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:45min ›Ready in:55min

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 C / Gas 4. Grease a round 23cm cake tin. Beat the egg yolks with the sugar until pale and thick. Add the oil and almonds and mix well.
  2. In a separate bowl with a clean whisk beat the egg whites until they form stiff peaks. Fold them into the egg yolk mixture with a spatula. Transfer the mixture to the prepared tin.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven until a skewer comes out clean, about 45 minutes.

Other ideas

Use ground hazelnuts or walnuts instead of almonds.

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(5)


Almond Cake

This is a splendid cake. I have eaten almond cakes in other parts of Spain, but this one is special. Pilgrims and tourists who visit the great Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, where the relics of the apostle Saint James are believed to be buried, see the cake in the windows of every pastry shop and restaurant. It is usually marked with the shape of the cross of the Order of Santiago. I have watched the cake being made in many sizes, big and small, thin and thick, over a pastry tart base at a bakery called Capri in Pontevedra. This deliciously moist and fragrant homey version is without a base. There is sometimes a little cinnamon added, but I find that masks the delicate flavor of orange and almonds and prefer it without it.

When I suggested to a man associated with the tourist office in Galicia that the tarta was a Jewish Passover cake, I was dragged to a television studio to tell it to all. The hosts thought the idea made sense. The Galician city of Coruña is on the Jewish tourist route, because of its synagogue and old Jewish quarter. Jews from Andalusia, who fled from the Berber Almohads' attempts to convert them in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries came to Galicia, where they planted grapevines and made wine.

The cake is normally made in a wide cake or tart pan and so comes out low, but it is equally good as a thicker cake.

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Almond and orange passover cake

Happy almost Passover! I am getting ready to zip on over to Chicago for my family seder but before I go I must show you this year's Passover cake! It's not chocolatey, like last year's, rather it's inspired by the flourless tangerine apricot cake from olives, lemons, and za'atar and an almond cake recipe that my friend marshy gave me, which calls for an entire orange (the peel and all!) to be chopped up and tossed in the batter. both of them were quite similar to my valentine's day almond cake but I loved the addition of the citrus. Eggboy, on the other hand, did not. So rather than adding a whole entire orange into the mix, I took a cue from yossy's grapefruit tarts, threw a supreme party, and then sprinkled in just a wee bit of zest to brighten the whole situation.

this is not a super model cake! it looks great when it comes out of the oven, but after a few minutes of cooling, it collapses just slightly to turn into a very rustic, yet lovable dessert. it's almost like a sweet crustless quiche that's packed with ground almonds (thanks to king arthur's almond flour, which is suuuper finely ground) and balanced out by a little zing of orange. it's great with a heavy dusting of powdered sugar or a dollop of whipped cream (or whipped coconut cream) or both!


Recipe: This flourless almond Passover cake is adaptable to what you have on hand

Flourless Almond Cake Karoline Boehm Goodnick for The Boston Globe

Passover may not look the same this year as it has in years past -- families will have to gather around the Seder table virtually and menus may be missing some traditional favorites -- but cooks will scour their own cabinets and supermarket websites to find a few ingredients to make things feel as normal as possible. This flourless cake is very adaptable to what you have on hand. If you have almond flour (pure ground almonds) in the cupboard, use it here and skip the process of grinding almonds. Add it to the recipe when the almonds go in with the full amount of sugar called for. You can use skinned or blanched almonds or a combination cobble together what you have as long as it equals 2 1/2 cups. And if you can't find sliced almonds for the garnish, skip them. To flavor the cake, use orange or lemon rind add the spices or leave them out. The fat here is olive oil, but canola is fine, too. The only rule to cooking during isolation is that exceptions are the rule. Next year's dessert can be a masterpiece this year's will be homey and delicious.

Vegetable oil (for the pan)
cups slivered or whole blanched or unblanced (raw) almonds
¾cup sugar
3 eggs, separated
cup olive oil
Grated rind of 1 orange
¼teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of ground nutmeg
½teaspoon salt
cup sliced almonds (for garnish)

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Oil a 9-inch cake pan, line the bottom with a round of parchment paper cut to fit it, and oil the paper.

2. In a food processor, pulse the almonds with 1/4 cup of the sugar until it resembles a very fine meal or flour do not over process.

3. In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks, olive oil, and orange rind to blend them. With a rubber spatula, stir in the ground almonds (or almond flour, if using), cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.

4. In an electric mixer with a whisk attachment, beat the egg whites on medium speed. When they are frothy, slowly beat in the remaining 1/2 cup sugar. When all of the sugar has been added, and the whites form stiff peaks, remove the bowl from the mixer stand.

5. Add a large spoonful of egg whites to the almond batter and stir to lighten it. Working in batches, gently fold the almond mixture into the egg whites, taking care not to deflate the whites too much.

6. Transfer the batter to the cake pan and smooth the top. Sprinkle with sliced almonds. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and the center is set.

7. Set the cake on a metal rack and leave to cool for 10 minutes. Gently run a small metal spatula around the edge of the cake to loosen it from the sides of the pan. Carefully invert the cake onto a flat plate or board. Remove and discard the parchment paper. Set a serving platter upside down on the cake and invert them together so the cake is sitting right side up on the platter. Leave to cool completely.

Karoline Boehm Goodnick

Passover may not look the same this year as it has in years past -- families will have to gather around the Seder table virtually and menus may be missing some traditional favorites -- but cooks will scour their own cabinets and supermarket websites to find a few ingredients to make things feel as normal as possible. This flourless cake is very adaptable to what you have on hand. If you have almond flour (pure ground almonds) in the cupboard, use it here and skip the process of grinding almonds. Add it to the recipe when the almonds go in with the full amount of sugar called for. You can use skinned or blanched almonds or a combination cobble together what you have as long as it equals 2 1/2 cups. And if you can't find sliced almonds for the garnish, skip them. To flavor the cake, use orange or lemon rind add the spices or leave them out. The fat here is olive oil, but canola is fine, too. The only rule to cooking during isolation is that exceptions are the rule. Next year's dessert can be a masterpiece this year's will be homey and delicious.

Vegetable oil (for the pan)
cups slivered or whole blanched or unblanced (raw) almonds
¾cup sugar
3 eggs, separated
cup olive oil
Grated rind of 1 orange
¼teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of ground nutmeg
½teaspoon salt
cup sliced almonds (for garnish)

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Oil a 9-inch cake pan, line the bottom with a round of parchment paper cut to fit it, and oil the paper.

2. In a food processor, pulse the almonds with 1/4 cup of the sugar until it resembles a very fine meal or flour do not over process.

3. In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks, olive oil, and orange rind to blend them. With a rubber spatula, stir in the ground almonds (or almond flour, if using), cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.

4. In an electric mixer with a whisk attachment, beat the egg whites on medium speed. When they are frothy, slowly beat in the remaining 1/2 cup sugar. When all of the sugar has been added, and the whites form stiff peaks, remove the bowl from the mixer stand.

5. Add a large spoonful of egg whites to the almond batter and stir to lighten it. Working in batches, gently fold the almond mixture into the egg whites, taking care not to deflate the whites too much.

6. Transfer the batter to the cake pan and smooth the top. Sprinkle with sliced almonds. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and the center is set.

7. Set the cake on a metal rack and leave to cool for 10 minutes. Gently run a small metal spatula around the edge of the cake to loosen it from the sides of the pan. Carefully invert the cake onto a flat plate or board. Remove and discard the parchment paper. Set a serving platter upside down on the cake and invert them together so the cake is sitting right side up on the platter. Leave to cool completely. Karoline Boehm Goodnick


Persian Almond Cardamom Pistachio Cake Photoshoot

This cake is easy to make, but the best part was taking the photographs of the cake. Most of the time when I shoot food, I do it in the morning because the sunlight is more stable. My condo faces the city of Miami &ndash the west side - and after 12:00 pm the sunlight hits my whole place and the light is too intense. So the mornings are best for a lot of indirect sunlight. Sometimes when there are a lot of clouds, the quality of lighting is unstable as the sun comes out, then behind a cloud, then back out again. Besides being extremely frustrating during the picture taking, the post-shoot editing part becomes too difficult to achieve the look I want.

This time I decided to shoot for the first time early in the evening to get a dark background with a bright food. It was a lot of fun and I got so excited that I ended up taking over 200 pictures. It was crazy!

I really love the flavor of this Persian Almond Cardamom Pistachio Cake. I love adding cardamom to any dish, savory or sweet, to give it an extra warm taste and aromatic fragrance.

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If you are looking for more Jewish traditional dessert recipes for Hanukkah or Passover, check out these recipes.

This is a flour-less cake made with almond meal, and to accentuate the flavor I added almond extract. One thing that is different from the original recipe is that I use FIVE Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil instead of vegetable oil. We have a number of baking recipes here using EVOO instead of vegetable oil or cooking oil.


Recipe Summary

  • ½ teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder for dusting, or as needed
  • 2 (8 ounce) packages semi-sweet chocolate squares, coarsely chopped
  • ½ cup butter
  • 5 large eggs, separated
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • ¼ cup chocolate chips
  • ¼ cup crushed almonds
  • 1 teaspoon confectioners' sugar for dusting, or as needed
  • ½ teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder for dusting, or as needed

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

Grease a 9-inch springform pan and dust with 1/2 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder.

Melt chopped chocolate squares and butter in a heavy saucepan over low heat, stirring until smooth, 5 to 10 minutes.

Whisk egg yolks and vanilla extract together in a large bowl.

Gradually whisk chocolate and butter mixture into egg yolk mixture until well blended.

Beat egg whites in a separate bowl with an electric mixer on high speed until soft peaks form. Gradually beat sugar into egg whites until sugar dissolves and egg whites hold stiff peaks.

Fold 1/3 of the egg white mixture into chocolate mixture. Gently fold in remaining egg white mixture until just blended and batter is smooth and fluffy.

Spread batter evenly into prepared springform pan.

Bake in the preheated oven until sides begin to pull away from pan and top is set in center, about 25 minutes.

Let torte cool in pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes before removing the sides of pan.

Place chocolate chips into a microwave-safe bowl and heat in microwave on full power for 1 minute. Stir the chips. Continue to heat in 15-second intervals, stirring after each time, until the chocolate chips have melted and are warm and smooth. Do not overheat.

Drizzle melted chocolate chips onto torte. Sprinkle crushed almonds and a dusting of confectioners' sugar and 1/2 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder, or as needed, onto the torte before serving..


My parents were the model of discreetness. Social, well-known and very involved with our local synagogue, family mealtimes were nonetheless private affairs, the six of us finding ourselves around the dinner table every night without guests, friends, family or company of any sort. The food was plentiful but plain, a mix of Russian Jewish cooking, all-American meat-and-potatoes cuisine and 1970’s convenience foods. The holidays in our home followed form and were low-key and simple, never much hoopla or decoration, rarely a lot of special cooking or baking filling our home with culinary memories.

Passover was the exception. The Jewish festival, joyous in its commemoration of the Jews’ exodus from slavery in Egypt towards the Promised Land, was a treat because we went to celebrate – and eat – at the Rosenberg’s house. Mrs. Rosenberg was the Jewish Mama extraordinaire, overseeing her kosher kitchen and her family with love, tradition, an iron fist and a huge personality. And her cooking was everything that my own mother’s was not: extraordinary and delicious! Her Apple-Noodle Kugel warm from the oven, dense and just sweet with a crisp cinnamon-sugar topping, was my ultimate comfort food I loved it so much that she made a huge baking pan of it just for me as a special Bat Mitzvah gift! She was a legendary cook in our small Jewish community, so spending Passover at her home was sure to mean a fabulous meal, an event looked forward to eagerly by a happy eater such as I.

The rules concerning what is to be eaten and, more importantly, what cannot be eaten by Jews for the duration of the 8-day festival is extremely strict. Jews are forbidden to eat chometz, any food containing barley, wheat, rye, oats, and spelt. No leavening is allowed. The interdiction of these ingredients symbolizes the fact that the Hebrews had no time to either wait for these five grains to grow or to let their baked bread rise as they made a hurried escape from Egypt. Ashkenazi Jews, whose origins are in Europe, also avoid eating corn, rice, peanuts, and legumes while the Sephardi Jews of Northern Africa and Spain do permit them. The days leading up to the holiday thus consist of an intense and thorough cleaning of one’s home in order to rid even the tiniest trace of each and every one of these foods. Followed, of course, by the cooking and baking of dishes and baked goods specific to and allowed during the holiday.

The first night – and for many the second night as well – of Passover is observed with a very traditional and festive ceremonial meal called a Seder at which the story of the exodus is read aloud. The meal follows a very specific order and is a combination of rituals and symbolic foods food and the rituals surrounding the preparation and eating of meals are intertwined with each and every Jewish holiday, yet none more so than Passover. The meal, the food placed on the table during the reading of the story and the story itself are woven together and intimately connected. In the center of the table is placed a beautiful, decorative plate holding six symbols necessary to the retelling of the story: maror and chazaret, the bitter herbs, normally horseradish, symbolizing the bitterness and harshness of slavery zeroa or a roasted lamb shank or bone, symbolizing the Paschal sacrificial lamb that was offered in the great Temple in Jerusalem charoset, usually a brownish-red mixture of nuts, apples, ground cinnamon and red wine representing the mortar the slaves used to build the Pyramids in Ancient Egypt karpas such as celery, parsley or lettuce to be dipped into salt water representing the tears of the slaves, the dipping process symbolizing hope and redemption beitzah, a roasted egg, both a symbol of mourning for the destruction of the Temple as well as a symbol of Spring and thus renewal.

The seventh symbol and the most well-known food of Passover is the matzoh, a special unleavened flatbread of Passover-friendly flour and water which is not only symbolic of our escape from slavery and the 40 years spent wandering through the wilderness, but it is eaten as a reminder of what we were running from, a life of slavery and poverty thus inspiring humility and the true appreciation of our freedom. A plate covered with a decorative cloth holding a stack of three matzot is placed on the Seder table next to the Seder plate, each one playing a very specific role during the meal. And finally, the last symbol, near the Seder plate and the matzoh, is placed Elijah’s cup filled with wine this is for the Prophet Elijah whose visit is said to precede the coming of the Messiah.

Cooking and eating during Passover is a meticulous, studied affair, and many of us go out of our way to prepare special foods. After all, it is a festive occasion. Every year as this holiday approaches, I scour a multitude of cookbooks old and new for Passover-friendly recipes – flour and wheat products, grains and leavening agents are all forbidden. There is no way that I can go eight days without sweets in the house! As my own mother was not a baker, I grew up eating canned coconut macaroons and jelly smeared on matzoh to soothe my sweet tooth. All grown up, I spend quite a bit of time every year researching recipes and baking. This year, I was determined to create a cake that one-ups the old-fashioned, traditional Passover sponge cake, that inimitable standby, that emblematic myth of the holiday. Usually dry. Usually flavorless. A risky choice.

I perused my old cookbooks, played around with a few recipes, found a box of potato flour in my grocery store as I realized that all of my boxes of matzoh meal and matzoh flour had disappeared in the move. I had already made the Lemon Sauce and wanted something to accompany that smooth, luscious, tangy sauce. Lemons, almonds and a splash of vanilla. And I got beating! Egg whites, that is.

The cake was spectacular! It rose to dizzying heights! Light and fluffy like a great Passover sponge cake, the ground almonds, nonetheless, produced a sponge denser and moister than average. The lemon and almond flavors were delicate yet present and the beautiful, smooth, tangy Lemon Sauce complimented it to perfection. Whether for Passover or any other time of the year, this cake deserves a celebration! And it is ideal for those following a gluten-free regime. Enjoy!


Start Cooking

Prepare the Muffins

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (180 degrees Celsius).

Beat together the eggs and sugar until very pale yellow.

Add remaining ingredients except sugar and cinnamon mixture, and mix until just combined. Don&rsquot overmix.

In a separate bowl, combine topping ingredients with a fork or gently with your fingers.

Fill muffin cups one-third of the way.

Sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon and mix. Fill the muffin cups the rest of the way with batter. Sprinkle topping evenly over the tops.


Passover Desserts Recipes : The Perfect Passover Cake, by Leah Koenig

The prohibition on eating leavened bread during Passover doesn’t mean your desserts need to be dull, dry, and tasteless. Try this easy recipe for a Passover cake with chocolate, pears, and almonds, created by Leah Koenig, author of The Jewish Cookbook.

The Perfect Passover Cake
Serves 8

3/4 cup roughly chopped roasted, unsalted almonds
1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
1½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
2/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups almond flour
2 tablespoons potato starch
½ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
3 large eggs, at room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 medium Bosc pears, peeled, quartered and cut into ½-inch pieces

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees and line a 9-inch round springform cake pan with parchment paper set aside.

2. In a bowl, stir together the chopped almonds, brown sugar, cinnamon and chocolate chips set aside.

3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the almond flour, potato starch, baking powder, and salt set aside.

4. Crack the eggs into a large bowl. With an electric mixer set on medium-high speed, beat eggs until well combined and bubbly, about 1 minute. Add sugar, beating until mixture is pale yellow and billowy, 2 to 3 minutes. With the still beaters on, slowly pour in the oil, followed by vanilla, beating until combined. Use a spatula to gently fold the almond flour mixture into wet batter until just combined.

5. Pour half of the batter into prepared pan. (It might seem like too little batter at this point, but it swells in the oven.) Top evenly with half of pears, followed by half of the almond-chocolate mixture. Add remaining batter, using a spatula to smooth. Sprinkle with remaining pears and almond-chocolate mixture.

6. Bake until a tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, 40 to 45 minutes. If the top of the cake is browning too quickly, drape it loosely with aluminum foil. Remove cake from oven and set pan on a wire rack. Let cool completely before slicing and serving.


Nondairy Desserts

Apple-Ginger Tishpishti (Gluten-Free Almond and Walnut Cake)

You might make this flavorful apple-ginger cake once with Passover in mind, but we have a pretty good feeling you'll be bringing it back all year long. The batter uses almond flour in place of wheat flour, keeping it gluten-free incorporating grated apple ensures it remains moist and tender.

Chocolate Chip Meringue Cookies

Chocoholics will love these light little meringue cookies, which put the bittersweet flavor of high-quality dark chocolate front and center. Making the meringue itself constitutes the lion's share of the work here, and even that isn't as tough as you might think if you're new to the process—our tests have shown that even if a dab of yolk makes its way into the bowl, your egg whites will still whip up just fine.

Apple Compote

An old-fashioned apple compote makes an elegant dish on its own, or a perfect accompaniment to other desserts, whether it's Passover or not. Poaching the peeled and sliced apples in both cider and cider vinegar fortifies their flavor, and the right blend of aromatics—nutmeg, cinnamon, lemon zest, and ginger—helps enhance their aroma. The slow, gentle poaching ensures the fruit turns out tender, not mushy.

Mango Sorbet

Sweet, buttery Ataúlfo mangoes are in season this time of year, so Passover is the ideal occasion to make a batch of this simple yet devastatingly good sorbet—all it takes is mangoes, lime juice, sugar, and a little salt. Thanks to the high ratio of fruit to water, the sorbet churns up extremely rich and creamy, with a beautiful deep-golden color.

Pear, Riesling, and Ginger Sorbet

The sophisticated flavor profile of this sorbet is built on the unexpected combination of mild, fruity pear sweet-and-tart Riesling and spicy ginger—a little less unexpected, perhaps, when you remember that pears poached in wine is a classic Continental dessert. Look for a moderately sweet Riesling with an alcohol content of around 12%. The amount of ginger called for here is enough to give the sorbet a nice kick, although you can cut it down a little if you prefer.



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